What are DNIs?

"Prescription medications may change the way the body absorbs or utilizes certain micronutrients, raising overall levels, especially if the person is also supplementing with a daily vitamin. And, on the flip side, the daily vitamin, herb or other supplement may impact the effectiveness of the medication. These are called drug-nutrient interactions (DNIs)." — Brandi Cole, PharmD, pharmacist
at Persona Nutrition

Explore the Database

Drug-nutrient
interaction database

Enter a medication or over-the-counter product you are taking to
check for interactions with Persona vitamins or supplements.

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Common Drug Interactions

Our team has developed a database of over 2,500 drugs that interact with nutritional supplements. Below we highlight the top eight, based on customer input.

Immunity

Zinc

When taken simultaneously with some medications, zinc can bind with the drug in the stomach and form complexes making it more difficult for the body to absorb the medication. This is a common interaction with thyroid medications and certain types of antibiotics.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C may increase estrogen levels by altering the way they body metabolizes the hormone. This can increase the side effects a patient may experience in particular with hormone replacement therapy or oral contraceptives containing estrogen.

Immunosuppressive Therapy

Patient's using immunosuppressive therapies should consult their health care provider prior to taking any supplement that may stimulate their immune system.

High Blood Pressure

Antihypertensives + Garlic

For those taking antihypertensives, garlic supplements may have an additive effect with these prescription drugs and should be avoided.

Diuretics + Fish Oil

Because diuretics can decrease blood pressure, when combined with supplements that may also lower blood pressure, diuretics could potentially increase risk for hypotension.

Mood

Antidepressants + 5-HTP

5-HTP is a precursor of serotonin. Combining supplemental 5-HTP with antidepressant medications that increase serotonin levels in the brain could theoretically lead to serotonin syndrome, a dangerous overload of serotonin in the brain. Common side effects of serotonin syndrome include headache, confusion, and loss of muscle coordination, but in severe cases result in irregular heart rhythm or seizure.

Anxiety Medications + Grapefruit

Grapefruit can interfere with certain antianxiety medications by altering enzymes responsible for transporting these medications into the blood stream and the breakdown of these medications. This results in increased side effects of antianxiety medications, like prolonged sedation. Grapefruit should be avoided with antianxiety medications to ensure appropriate levels of medications in the blood stream.

Blood Thinning

Warfarin + Vitamin K

Vitamin K is an essential vitamin to promote normal amounts of blood clotting in the body and preventing excessive bleeding. However, when combined, vitamin K can work against these anticoagulant medications and increase the risk for a blood clot.

Birth Control

Oral Contraceptives + Green Tea Extract

Certain oral contraceptives can decrease caffeine clearance in the body by up to 65%, which can increase the effects of caffeine in green tea.

Oral Contraceptives + Garlic

Garlic should be avoided with oral contraceptives to ensure the drug is not cleared too quickly from the body, and potentially make the medication less effective.

Immunosuppresant

Immunosuppresant Therapy + Spirulina

Spirulina is thought to stimulate the body's immune system. Immunosuppressant therapies, commonly used to treat Crohn's disease and psoriasis, can be less effective if the body's immune system is activated.

Cholesterol

Statins + CoQ10

Cholesterol lowering medications, called statins, block your body from producing cholesterol. It is thought that using a CoEnzyme Q10 supplement may help relieve muscle discomfort in patients taking a statin therapy.

Diabetes

Anidiabetic Medications + Ashwagandha

Preliminary evidence shows that ashwagandha root powder can decrease blood glucose. To avoid an additive effect of blood sugar becoming too low, Ashwagandha should be avoided with those taking blood sugar lowering drugs.

Thyroid

Thyroid Medications + Iron

When taken simultaneously, thyroid medications and iron form insoluble complexes in the gastrointestinal tract preventing the absorption of thyroid medication into the blood stream. Iron supplements should be taken at least two hours apart from thyroid medications to ensure complete absorption of the drug.

Speak with your doctor, pharmacist, or nutritionist to better understand any possible DNIs
prior to starting a new medication or nutritional supplement program.

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