Best Vitamins for Vegetarians and Vegans | Persona

Best Vitamins and Supplements for Vegetarians and Vegans

Best Vitamins for Vegetarians or Vegans

Plant-Based Diet Benefits

Whether you’ve made the choice to follow a plant-based diet for health, environmental or personal reasons, the potential health benefits are plentiful:

  • Studies have shown vegetarians on average are 25% less likely to die of heart disease (3)
  • Those who follow a plant-based diet have a reduced risk of diabetes. (3)
  • Vegetarian diets are also associated with lower blood pressure (8)
  • Vegetarians and vegans have a lower risk of metabolic syndrome (9)

While eating an abundance of fruits, vegetables, legumes, grains and nuts is a healthy approach to creating a diet, there are nutritional considerations to be mindful of when following a vegan or vegetarian diet that can result in some nutrient deficiencies.

Here are the best options for supplementing when following a plant-based diet.

Best Vitamins for Vegetarians or Vegans

Vitamin B12

B12 is necessary for brain and nervous system health, as well as forming red blood cells, and helps with DNA regulation.  While B12 can be found in some fermented and fortified foods, it’s primarily found in animal products. Studies have shown that vegetarians and vegans tend to be at a greater risk for B12 deficiency and recommend supplemental intake. (7) As we age, our body’s ability to absorb B12 also decreases because of a reduction in an intrinsic factor. Older vegetarians and vegans should be taking a B12 supplement daily, look for something with at least 2.4 mcg per day. (5)

Iron

Dietary iron comes in two forms, heme and non-heme. The iron found in plant foods is non-heme and, while abundant, is less bioavailable and influenced by other food components, making vegetarians at a greater risk for deficiency. Things like tannins and phytates found in plant foods can impair the body’s ability to absorb iron. (1) Those following a plant-based diet who consume primarily non-heme forms of iron could benefit from iron supplementation, when a deficiency is determined by a physician. Iron absorption can be increased when taken with citric acid, so look for a supplement that contains vitamin C as well. For adult men, 8mg per day is sufficient, but for women, especially those of menstruating age, more is required, up to 18mg per day. (4)

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is responsible for helping with calcium absorption, necessary for bone growth and helps with immune function. (2,10) We can make vitamin D by converting UV rays absorbed through the skin from the sun and from animal products, most abundantly fish and eggs. (10) A small amount can be found in mushrooms and fortified foods. Those following a vegetarian or vegan diet consisting of primarily whole foods are at risk of being vitamin D deficient. Those living in areas without consistent sunlight year-round, work indoors or wear sunscreen are at an even greater risk. Daily supplementation with 1000-2000 IU is common and has been shown to be safe and vitamin D supplements can be animal or plant based. (6)

Fatty Acids

If you aren’t eating fish, you probably aren’t getting a large amount of omega-3 fatty acids in your diet. However, there are numerous sources of omega-3 fatty acids a vegan can choose from, including chia seeds, flax seeds, hemp seeds, and seaweed. Fatty acids are essential for nervous system function, including brain health. In fact, DHA may even prevent age-related dementia.3 Obtaining omega-3 fatty acids in your diet is a great way to ensure you are keeping your nervous system, including your brain and eyes, happy. In addition to foods, you can support your diet with a high-quality, microalgae-sourced DHA supplement.

Zinc

In the case that you are on a lower fat vegetarian diet and not eating seeds, nuts and legumes, you need Zinc!  Zinc is important for overall health and especially critical for optimal immunity and fighting flu and colds. Protect your body & increase your libido. Vim & Vigor!

Maca

Experience the energy of the ancients with this awesome adaptogenic herb that is said to increase your abilities in bed….who knew?!

Vitamin C

Increase your immunity & energy. Vigor! So popular, you even get the perks of exploring some options like vegan collagen peptides.

CoQ10

Support your heart and it will support you on the court, on the track and in the sack!

Cinnamon

This stabilizes your blood sugar and keeps you level….and being “level” is a good thing!

Garlic

Garlic works wonders on your insides and if you are worried about eating it, capsule form is the way to go.

Ginger

Warming, healing and invigorating. Ginger is key to vitality and bodily harmony.

Getting the Nutrients You Need

If you are looking for the highest quality Vitamin and Mineral Supplements personalized for you, please go to www.personanutrition.com and take our online questionnaire providing individualized vitamin and mineral recommendations. Persona is the only Science Based supplement provider on the web today! Take advantage of our knowledge and use it to your health’s benefit!

Sources:

  1. Abbaspour N, Hurrell R, Kelishadi R. Review on iron and its importance for human health. J Res Med Sci. 2014;19(2):164-74.
  2. Aranow C. Vitamin D and the Immune System. Journal of Investigative Medicine. 2011;59(6):881-886. doi:10.2310/jim.0b013e31821b8755.
  3. Harvard Health Publishing. Becoming a vegetarian. Harvard Health. https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/becoming-a-vegetarian. Accessed April 4, 2019.
  4. Office of Dietary Supplements – Iron. NIH Office of Dietary Supplements. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Iron-HealthProfessional/.
  5. Office of Dietary Supplements – Vitamin B12. NIH Office of Dietary Supplements. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminB12-HealthProfessional/.
  1. Office of Dietary Supplements – Vitamin D. NIH Office of Dietary Supplements. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional/
  2. Pawlak R, Parrott SJ, Raj S, Cullum-dugan D, Lucus D. How prevalent is vitamin B(12) deficiency among vegetarians?. Nutr Rev. 2013;71(2):110-7.
  3. Pettersen BJ, Anousheh R, Fan J, et al. Vegetarian diets and blood pressure among white subjects:results from the Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2). Public Health Nutr. 2012;15:1909-16.
  4. Rizzo NS, Sabate J, Jaceldo-Siegl K, et al. Vegetarian dietary patterns are associated with a lower risk of the metabolic syndrome. Diabetes Care.2011;34:1225-1227
  5. The physiology of vitamin D. Vitamin D Council. https://www.vitamindcouncil.org/the-physiology-of-vitamin-d/. Published July 6, 2016.
  6. Yokoyama Y, Nishimura K, Barnard ND, et al. Vegetarian diets and blood pressure: a meta-analysis. JAMA Intern Med. 2014 Feb 24. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.14547.
This information is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging. Do not use the information from this article for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing medication or other treatment. Always speak with your physician or other healthcare professional before taking any medication or nutritional, herbal or homeopathic supplement, or using any treatment for a health problem. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem, contact your health care provider promptly. Do not disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking professional advice because of something you have read in this article,
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